How I used to take yohimbe before I switched to tongkat ali

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The original version of this article was published several years ago. My current sexual enhancement regimen is no longer based on yohimbe. From yohimbe, I have moved to pharmaceutical yohimbine, from yohimbine to cabergoline and other dopaminergics, and from cabergoline to tongkat ali. So, the headline "My own current yohimbe regimen" isn't really up-to-date. But this article is referred to on the Internet under this title, so I can't just change it.

Throughout the years, I have tested a good number of yohimbe and yohimbine products. While I have had some success with a yohimbe/tribulus combination product, it is clear that pure pharmaceutical yohimbine is superior to any product that just uses yohimbe bark. With yohimbine tablets manufactured in a proper pharmaceutical laboratory, you can exactly dose your intake of the active ingredient.

On the other hand, with a yohimbe bark product, you'll always keep on guessing: how much yohimbe do you get? Unfortunately, the yohimbine content isn't even consistent between production batches of one and the same brand.

For this reason, if you want to use the active ingredient of yohimbe bark for sexual enhancement, then look for yohimbine tablets, NOT for yohimbe capsules. The active ingredient uses the ending -bine, while the bark name ends with -be.

With the refined alkaloid, yohimbine, you also avoid a good number of unpleasant side effects, such as headache. But most importantly, if you buy yohimbine, you know that you get a product that works for sexual enhancement. Many yohimbe bark products are entirely worthless because they contain almost no yohimbine.

When I used yohimbine, I usually took it first thing in the morning, as yohimbine carries me for about 20 hours. Taking the yohimbine first thing in the morning, it usually cleared sufficiently by 2 or 3 in the morning to allow me at least some sleep before the next day.

I have later discovered what I could take to allow me to go to sleep at any time I decided for, even if I have taken yohimbine just a few hours earlier.

According to common recommendations and my experience, yohimbine can be taken in several ways:

The first is as a dose of about 10 mg about two hours before sex. This will greatly enhance the firmness of an erection (not necessarily the size), and have a pronounced effect on orgasm (tickling along the spinal cord). The advantage of such a regimen is the direct effect on sexual performance; the disadvantage is that you will either not sleep for an additional 20 hours, or that you will need a medication (referred to in other of my articles) to go to sleep earlier.

The second way would be to take it every second or third day first thing in the morning. My preference with this kind of usage is 15 to 20 mg of yohimbine. The yohimbine will still have an effect on evening intercourse, though the effect will not be as strong as when the yohimbine is taken some two hours before sex. The advantage of such a regimen is that the interference with sleep is bearable.

The third way to take yohimbine is as a long-term daily-use (or almost daily-use) therapy. This is what most physicians recommend; it also conforms to the instructions given on package brochures and on many supplement bottles. In that case, the dosage should be the equivalent of about 10 mg.

Yohimbe and jealousy

Continuing yohimbine use for weeks or months, though not necessarily on a daily basis, may increase one's susceptibility to jealousy. Yohimbine is an anxioergic agent, which means it can be clinically used to induce fear. There is a similarity between the hypersensitized states of fear and jealousy. Jealousy is a very interesting emotion. While it can be mental stress, it is, beyond doubt, also a great aphrodisiac. When I'm jealous, I don't need any sexual booster. When you are jealous enough, even at an advanced age, you can outperform men 25 years your junior.

The yohimbine-induced susceptibility to jealousy may manifest itself after several month of regular (not necessarily daily) yohimbine use.

Modulating desire

It is common knowledge that levels of desire depend on two physiological systems: neurotransmitters and hormones.

Among the neurotransmitters involved in sexual appetite, dopamine seems to be of exceptional importance. Pharmaceutical agents I used to enhance the dopaminergic system are cabergoline and bromocriptine.

Nausea is a common side effect of bromocriptine. It has taken me a lot of experimentation to find out how I have to take bromocriptine for sexual enhancement, minus the nausea. See related articles for details.

I have tried many medications for testosterone enhancement. I started with plain testosterone supplementation that doesn't work. I also tried clomiphene to jumpstart the hypothalamus into producing more luteneizing hormone (which regulates testosterone). And I have tried the aromatase inhibitor Arimidex (anastrozole) to keep the conversion of testosterone into estrogen at bay (I have tried it alone, as well as with clomiphene, as well as with DHEA). While I believe (based on recent literature) that it may (or may not) be beneficial for men to keep estrogen down by inhibiting its synthesis from testosterone, I also believe that the effect on sex is practically nil.

I have now switched to the "Indonesian" root tongkat ali (pasak bumi in Indonesia, eurycoma longifolia by its Latin name). The root has scientifically been proven to raise testosterone levels, and it is widely consumed in Southeast Asia as a sexual booster.

While I wasn't really satisfied with the capsules I initially tested, I am thoroughly impressed with a 1:50 extract I have been using lately. See related articles in this website and in other of my domains for more information on this wonderful stuff.

sanare.sam@gmail.com

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References:

1 Sunderland, T.C.H. Cunningham, A.B. Tchoundjeu, Z. Ngo-Mpeck, M-L. Laid. S.A., Yohimbe (Pausinystalia johimbe) [2004-01-01]

2 Amy Myers, Fermin Barrueto, Refractory priapism associated with ingestion of yohimbe extract, oxicology Observations Journal of Medical Toxicology December 2009, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 223-225

3 P. A. De Smet and O. S. Smeets, Potential risks of health food products containing yohimbe extracts.

4 Betz JM, White KD, der Marderosian AH, Gas chromatographic determination of yohimbine in commercial yohimbe products, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Washington, DC 20204, USA.